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LIST OF NIGERIAN FOODSTUFF

Please note that
I try to use the names
they are called in Nigeria
minus the accents.
remember the alphabet?
Well, since I don't want
to draw up all my words,
in the table below, e, o,
and s will stand for the
letters with the dots
under them (but it might
not be obvious if the
title is also a link).
different foods listed
under 'eaten with'
means it can be with
any of those, it does
not necessarily mean it
is eaten will ALL of
those, though in some
situations, a combination
may be made.
this page describes the
food. For how to make
them, visit the recipes
page, and for where to
buy them or eat them
(restaurants, etc.), visit
the buying & eating
page.
FOOD
(click for recipe)
WAYS PREPARED
(click for recipe)
EATEN WITH
(click for description on this
page)
obe (soup)
obe ata (pepper soup):
thick sauce made by boiling
ground tomatoes, ground
pepper, meat or fish, meat
broth or fish broth, onions,
vegetable oil or palm oil,
and other spices.
many many dishes
efo (vegetable soup):
similar to the above except
that different types of
leaves are added to it.
many many dishes
obe egusi (plain): This is
made by grinding melon
seeds, and then cooking it
with the meat and spices. It
usually ends up being
yellowish-orange in color.
many many dishes
obe egusi (with efo):
Similar to the above except
that different types of
leaves are added to it.
many many dishes
'soup extras': the following
are also soups that are
usually eaten in addition to
pepper soup with the meals
they are eaten with
ewedu: green leaves
chopped up and boiled in
water, usually has a
slippery texture.
eba, amala, funfun, farina,
iyan...
ila: okra cut up into small
pieces, and boiled in water,
also has a slippery texture.
eba, amala, funfun, farina,
iyan...
apon/ogbono: made from
boiling ground oro seeds in
water, also ends up having
a slippery texture.
eba, amala, funfun, farina,
iyan...
iresi (rice)
white: rice cooked or
steamed in water, then
usually covered with soup.
beans, plantains, meat, ...
jollof rice: rice cooked (or
baked) with ground
tomatoes, peppers,
sometimes meat and
vegetables, other spices,
and comes out reddish in
color.
beans, plantains, meat, ...
fried rice: rice cooked in
oils, vegetables, meats, and
spices.
beans, plantains, meat, ...
ewa (beans)
regular: the beans are
cooked with ground
tomatoes, ground peppers,
and spices. Sometimes
cooked in combination with
maize, or rice, with or
without soup.
rice, plantains, yams, ogi,
bread, ...
moyin-moyin: the beans
are skinned and ground,
then mixed with ground
tomatoes and ground
peppers, meats,
vegetables, eggs and
spices, then put in either
aluminum foil or aluminum
cans, steamed in a large
pot, then taken out and
cooled.
alone, with rice, or at
breakfast time with ogi
akara: the beans are
skinned and ground, then
mixed with ground tomatoes
and ground peppers and
spices, then fried in
vegetable or palm oil
usually eaten at breakfast
time, sometimes with ogi
isu (yam - there are at
least three different kinds,
the white ones, the yellow
ones, and the 'water yams'.
Note: this is NOT what most
Americans know as "yams".)
boiled plain: White or yellow
yams are peeled, sliced up,
usually into pieces about 3
centimeters, and boiled in
water with salt
vegetable oil, palm oil, eggs,
beans, soup,...
fried: White or yellow yams
are cut up into long thin
squares and fried in
vegetable oil or palm oil.
usually by itself or as a side
in a meal
ojoj o: Water yams are cut
up and fried in vegetable oil
or palm oil.
usually by itself or as a side
in a meal
asaro: White or yellow yams
are peeled, sliced, and diced
into small cubes, then
cooked with ground
tomatoes, peppers,
sometimes meat, other
spices, and comes out
reddish in color.
usually by itself
ikokore: It is similar to
asaro but made with a
different type of yam called
'water yam' that is softer in
texture, and when cooked,
usually comes out more
brownish in color.
usually by itself
iyan (pounded yam): The
yams are peeled, and
ground up on a mortar.
Then this 'powder' is placed
into boiling water until it has
a thick smooth structure.
Nowadays, you can bypass
the grounding stage by
buying the 'pounded yam
flour', and putting this in
boiling water to make
something which is close
enough for some people,
but not for others.
with soup
amala: dish made from
yams, but first, the yams
are ground and dried to
form a powder. This powder
is then put into boiling
water, and stirred/beaten
until it has a thick smooth
structure. The cooked
product ends up being very
dark brown in color.
with soup
ogede (plaintain - those
things that look like bigger
bananas)
dodo: sliced or diced
plantains, fried in vegetable
oil (some like them yellow,
some like them brown)
rice, beans, eggs, by itself...
boli: plantains baked whole
in the oven
rice, beans, eggs, by itself...
gari ('grain' made from the
root of the cassava plant.
This part is peeled, ground,
soaked, sieved, and then
dried out)
dried: as is
sprinkled over cooked
beans
with water: the gari
soaked in water, sugar and/
or milk sometimes added if
desired
as a snack, or alongside
with beans.
eba: the gari is put in boiling
water and stirred/beat until
it has a thick smooth
texture.
with soup.
funfun
dish also made from the
cassava plant. The plant is
peeled, ground, , soaked
sieved, then put under a
heavy material to get all
the moisture out of it, to
form a powder. Then, the
funfun is made from putting
this powder in some boiling
water, and stirring/beating it
until it has a thick smooth
texture.
with soup.
maize (yellow corn)
boiled: the corn is still on
the cob, and boiled in water
and salt
roasted: the corn is still on
the cob, and it is roasted in
the oven, or on a grill until it
is brown
adalu: the corn is off the
cob, and boiled with beans
usually covered with pepper
soup
tuwo: the corn is ground
into a powder, then put in
boiling water and stirred/
beat until it has a thick
smooth texture.
with soup.
ogi: dish made from corn.
The corn is ground and
dried, and made into a
powder. Then this powder is
placed in boiling water, and
cooked until it has a thin
smooth structure.
Nowadays, you may be able
to bypass the grinding
stage and buy powder than
you can use to make ogi on
a stove or a microwave.
usually at breakfast time,
by itself, or with beans, or
with akara, or with moyin-
moyin
aadun: the corn is ground,
and mixed with ground red
pepper. Then oil is added,
and it is put in ewe (those
green leaves that things
can be cooked in) and
cooked or baked. It ends up
being very spicy (hot) in
nature.
as a snack
kokoro: the corn is ground,
then mixed with some
ingredients, then rolled into
long (about 30 cm) thin
(about 1 cm) sticks and
fried in vegetable oil.
as a snack
suya
Pieces of meat are spiced
up, and then baked over a
grill on a stick with
vegetables (like kabob, but
it's usually much hotter)
As a snack, or as the side
to a meal.
puff-puff
snack made from deep
frying a dough mixture into
circular balls
as a snack, sometimes
dipped in sugar
sausage rolls
cooked sausage is rolled up
in a pastry, and baked in
the oven.
as a snack
meat pies
seasoned meat, potatoes,
and other vegetables and
placed in a pastry, and the
whole thing is baked.
as a snack
chin chin
Some dough is kneaded,
then rolled flat, then cut up
into small squares, and fried
in oil.
as a snack
scotch eggs
a mixture of some
ingredients are put
together, and then hard-
boiled eggs are rolled up
into them, and the eggs are
baked.
as a snack
groundnuts
shelled peanuts (as called
in America anyway)
raw, or boiled in salt water,
or roasted (eaten after the
shells are removed of
course)
other nuts
cashews, pecans, and
others
Here are descriptions of
"Cola Nuts" and their
symbolism (in the
appropriate ethnic groups)
as explained by a visitor:
Cola nuts: Some colanuts
have two carpsels, some
three, some four some five,
and some six which is the
highest number of carpsels
they can have. Usually we
use the one with four
carpsels. It is the one with
four carpsels that are most
usable. They are used for
both good and bad
medicines. By introducing
them to the child, we pray
for the child not to use it
negatively against anybody
neither will anybody use it
negatively against him.
Bitter cola: This has the
same reason as the colanut
above.
Obi is used to symbolizes
long life in a marriage. It is
wishing the couple a long
life together. It is broken
and passed around to all
the well-wishers present for
...


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